AOS 2018 Presentations

Arctic Observing Summit 2018: Day 1 Presentations (June 24th, 2018) 

For a detailed copy of the daily agenda, please click here.

AOS DAY 1

1) Welcome and Opening Comments: Peter Schlosser, Co-Chair, International Study of Arctic Change Science Steering Group/ Arizona State University, USA. Please click here to access a copy of this presentation.

2) Keynote: Sarah Kalhok Bourque, Northern Contaminants Program/ Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada. Please click here to access a copy of this presentation.

4) Introduction to AOS 2018: Themes, and guidelines for process, breakout sessions and participation: Hajo Eicken, Director, International Arctic Research Center, University of Alaska, Fairbanks, USA. Please click here to access a copy of this presentation.

 Supplementary links: a) Value-tree analysis through the IDA Science and Technology Policy Institute (STPI). The report is available here.

                                       b) The Global Ocean Observing System Framework for Ocean Observing. Find out more here.


5) Keynote: Michael Brubaker, Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, USA. Please click here to access a copy of this presentation.


AOS DAY 2

1) Keynote: Molly McCammon, Alaska Ocean Observing System, USA. Please click here to access a copy of this presentation.


AOS DAY 3

1) Day 2 Recap and Opening Remarks: Eva Kruemmel, Inuit Circumpolar Council, Canada. Please click here to access a copy of this presentation. 

2) Keynote: Finn Danielsen, Nordic Foundation for Development and Ecology, Denmark. Please click here to access a copy of this presentation.

"The Arctic Observing Summit (AOS) is a high-level, biennial summit that aims to provide community-driven, science-based guidance for the design, implementation, coordination and sustained long-term (decades) operation of an international network of Arctic observing systems. The AOS provides a platform to address urgent and broadly recognized needs of Arctic observing across all components of the Arctic system, including the human component. It fosters international communication and the widespread coordination of long-term observations aimed at improving understanding and responding to system-scale Arctic change."